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The Flowering of the Botanical Print Open Now

It's officially spring in Cleveland, and the weather is actually starting to feel like it!

Celebrate the season and check out The Flowering of the Botanical Print exhibition open through July 3, 2016. This show traces the history of the fruit and flower print from its humble beginnings as black-and-white woodcuts in late 15th-century herbals to the splendors of 19th-century color prints and the lavish publications of botanists Dr. Robert Thornton and Pierre Joseph Redouté.

Celebrating the centennials of the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Cleveland Botanical Garden, this show features more than 70 prints, drawings, and books illustrating the craftsmanship and scientific accuracy of botanical artists. At the core of the exhibition are works from the museum’s Donald Gray Memorial Collection of fruit and flower prints and related drawings, which was established by the Print Club of Cleveland in 1939 in memory of a former president who was a landscape architect.

The Eleanor Squire Library of the Cleveland Botanical Garden and the Dittrick Medical History Center and Museum have generously lent important books, including the earliest examples from the late 15th-century illustrated with woodcuts.

See some stunning images of pieces in the show below!

Botanical

Narcissus Tazetta, c. 1828. Pancrace Bessa (French, 1772–1846). Watercolor over graphite on vellum; 18.4 x 11.6 cm. Gift of the Print Club of Cleveland 1949.411. 

Botanical

The American Cowslip, 1801. Warner (British, active 1800-1810), after Peter Charles Henderson (British, active 1799, died 1829). Color aquatint, stipple, and etching with watercolor added by hand; 55.3 x 46 cm. Gift of the Print Club of Cleveland in memory of Mrs. Ralph King 1952.213. 

Botanical

Scarlet Flesh Romana Melon, 1812. George Brookshaw (British, active 1804–1819). Color aquatint and stipple with watercolor added by hand; 48.1 x 40.2 cm. Gift of the Print Club of Cleveland in honor of Arnold M. Davis 1955.312.
Guest Author

Christopher Moore

The Cleveland Museum of Art

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